OnlineDriversLicenses.org's Guide on When to Plead Guilty to a Traffic Ticket

onlinedriverslicenses blog: OnlineDriversLicenses.org's Guide on When to Plead Guilty to a Traffic Ticket

Depending on your specific situation, pleading guilty to a traffic ticket may or may not be a wise idea. For instance, if you are at risk of losing your driver’s license or you fear that your auto insurance rates will go up after receiving the ticket, you may be willing to fight the ticket. However, if you don’t have the time or the legal grounds to fight the ticket, pleading guilty may be a better choice. To help you determine whether you should plead guilty to a traffic ticket or not, the expert team at OnlineDriversLicenses.org has put together a comprehensive guide to assist you.

Instances When You Should Consider Pleading Guilty to a Traffic Ticket

Whether you have just received your first traffic ticket or you have several tickets on your driving record, the expert team at OnlineDriversLicenses.org recommends consulting with a traffic ticket attorney before making the decision to plead guilty to a traffic ticket or to fight the ticket. An attorney can help you to weigh the pros and cons of each option. However, certain situations may be more obvious than others. For example, if you know you are at fault and you take full responsibility of your traffic violation, pleading guilty is the best choice. However, if you feel that you were wrongly ticketed, fighting the ticket may seem more logical.

According to the group at OnlineDriversLicenses.org, you should consider pleading guilty to a traffic ticket only under certain circumstances, which include when:

  • You know that you are at fault.

  • The driving violation is minor and the fine is small.

  • You are not at risk of losing your driving privileges.

  • The violation can be proven. If there is valid proof that you have made a traffic violation, pleading guilty is your best bet.

  • The officer’s notes cannot be challenged. When a police officer pulls you over for performing a moving violation, he or she makes notes about the specific traffic violation. If the officer’s notes are subjective, you may be able to fight the ticket. For example, the officer may say that you made an unsafe turn. In this case, you could fight the ticket, saying that the officer’s view may have been obstructed. If not, you are better off pleading guilty.

  • You weren’t trying to avoid an accident. In some cases, drivers who perform a traffic violation to avoid a traffic accident may be able to fight the ticket, claiming a necessity defense. However, you cannot make this claim unless you were trying to avoid hitting a pedestrian, a deer or another vehicle.

  • Your vehicle was functioning properly. In some cases, you may be able to fight a traffic ticket if your vehicle was malfunctioning during the time of the moving violation. If your vehicle was functioning properly, you cannot make this claim, and you are better off pleading guilty to the ticket.

If you do plead guilty to a traffic ticket, you may be able to remove the traffic ticket from your driving record or reduce points from your driving record (if applicable) when you complete a state-approved driving school course.

The Disadvantages of Pleading Guilty

According to the team of experts at OnlineDriversLicenses.org, there are some risks to pleading guilty to a traffic ticket. For one, you may risk losing your driving privileges if you’ve received other recent tickets as well. Second, your traffic ticket may result in expensive fines, time spent in driving school and higher auto insurance premiums. Third, you will have a traffic ticket or driving points on your driving record.

The Advantages of Pleading Guilty

Although pleading guilty to a traffic ticket has its downsides, the group at OnlineDriversLicenses.org has found that there are also some advantages to pleading guilty. For one, fighting a traffic ticket often requires you to hire a traffic ticket attorney, which could result in expensive legal fees. Second, fighting a traffic ticket is often a time-consuming and drawn-out process. If you choose to represent yourself rather than hire a traffic ticket attorney, you’ll need to devote time to gathering evidence and finding witnesses to back you up. Third, you’ll need to devote at least a couple of days to court visits. And finally, there are no guarantees that you will successfully win your case. If the judge rules against you, you will be required to face the penalties and fines of your traffic ticket, in addition to the legal expenses of fighting the ticket.